July 2017

Advance Diversity Services hosts a free Justice of the Peace (JP) service in its Rockdale office on Friday mornings to help people with documents they need witnessing and/or certified.

We speak Bengali, Chinese, Hindi and Urdu.

 

What can a JP help you with?

JP volunteers play an important role in the legal system in New South Wales and provide a valuable service to the community.

A JP can witness and certify a range of legal documents (as follows).

  • Witness the signing of a statutory declaration

A statutory declaration is a written statement which a person declares to be true in the presence of an authorised witness. Various organisations often require information to be provided to them in a statutory declaration.

  • Witness the signing of an affidavit

An affidavit is a written statement for use as evidence in court proceedings. A person who makes an affidavit must promise that he or she is telling the truth, in the presence of an authorised witness.

  • Certify that a copy of an original document is a true copy

Organisations sometimes accept a certified copy of a document, instead of the original. This avoids a person having to mail or submit the original of a precious document, like a birth certificate or academic qualification.

 

When, where, and more information?

Every Friday 11.30 am to 12.30 pm

552 Princes Hwy, Rockdale 2216

Please call (02) 9597 5455 for more information

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Findings from a recent youth forum organised by Advance Diversity Services (ADS) will help shape health service provision in south-eastern Sydney to better meet the needs of newly arrived young people and youth from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) backgrounds across the region.

More than 50 young people from local high schools, including Intensive English Centres (IECs), were consulted about their health and wellbeing during the June 7 forum at Rockdale Town Hall as part of the Get Active project funded by Multicultural Health, South Eastern Sydney Local Health District.

Forum participants, drawn from local schools such as Beverly Hills Girls High school and Kogarah Intensive Language Centre, provided insights which identified gaps in health service provision in the region. They also pinpointed the barriers they faced when attempting to access services, participate in sport, and get involved in other health-related and social activities.

Staff of St George Youth Services and headspace facilitated the forum discussion.

‘Bullying, stress, depression, peer pressure, intergenerational conflict and social isolation were some of the issues identified by forum participants as having a negative impact on their health and wellbeing,’ said ADS Executive Officer Antoinette Chow.

She also said these and other findings from the forum will be disseminated to relevant health service providers to help them to improve their outcomes and services, which will make a positive difference to the lives of young people in the region.

This was the first CALD youth health forum organised by ADS. It builds on ADS’s active partnership with local schools and IECs, and on its previous engagement with students.

The Get Active Project aims to improve outcomes relating to health, wellbeing and social connectivity via participation in sports activities and information sessions targeting both newly arrived young people and young people from CALD backgrounds.